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Fruits Available in Davao, Philippines

Recently I posted an article about all the fresh vegetables available here in Davao. Well there are many fruits plentiful here too.

A lot of Filipinos know the health advantages of eating fruits and vegetables. You see fruits available in the Mall markets, wet markets and even little stalls along the roads. They will be bought for a snack, to be brought home or eaten as a refresher as they are just walking long. Fruits are a popular gift if visiting and is traditional at holidays. Bowls of fresh fruits will be out when friend or family members are visiting.

The nice thing is Filipinos are heath conscience where it dscn1612comes to fruits and they eat them regularly. Because of the low potassium in their diets Filipinos eat a lot of bananas. They are grown in abundance here and are not expensive. I like the way they make Banana-Q, they coat with sugar and fry them and sold on a stick. It is a common afternoon snack.

Some are known to us from our home countries and some are a local variety. A lot has been mentioned dscn1621about Durian. For me I do dscn1614not care for it, but that is not the only local fruit I will not partake. There is Jackfruit and Marang. For me Marang smells worse than Durian. I know many enjoy it and that is fine, just don’t ask me to try it, the smell is bad enough. I have never tired Jackfruit either, I was told I would not like it and I will follow that advice.

Some of the local fruits I have tried and enjoy are dscn1616Mangosten, Rumbatan and Lanzones. These you break open and eat the meat that surrounds the seed. I have a little trouble eating them since my front teeth are part of a bridge and they pop out.

There is pamelos which is a large citrus fruit. To me you taste the citrus but no distinct flavor.

Of course there are mangos, grapes, different dscn1617varieties of oranges, papaya, guava, pineapples, melons, Fuji apples and many varieties of banana. In some of the upper scale markets in malls you can find more imported fruits but the price reflects the importation.

Lemons are available but I do not know if grown locally. I have not seen limes. One common and widely used is calamansi. It is small 25-35 mm in diameter and has a sour taste. It is used squeezed into recipes, over foods or mixed with soy sauce. There is also a hot calamansi drink or cold and sweetened.

I apologize if I leave some out, and you can comment and tell me about them.

44 Responses to “Fruits Available in Davao, Philippines”

  1. Ray says:

    Bruce why do you say you would not like jackfruit? I had it once and it was sweet.

    • Bruce says:

      Ray,
      I do not know who told me not to try it. Ok, I will. If I get sick like Don, I guess I can use the laptop and continue blogging from the Throne.

  2. don m. says:

    I ate jack fruit once and liked it but it didn’t like me to well into the next day–thank you Imodium AD.

  3. Vicki says:

    Hi Bruce,

    Jackfruit or langka (as I know it) is yellow and sweet. I know it is sometimes added to halo-halo. Durian, I have not tried and don’t intend to since the smell alone keeps me away. If you decide to try the jackfruit, start with a couple of pieces and see how your stomach deals with it. :-)

    • Bruce says:

      Vicki,
      I will do, now that I am intrigued by the comments. I once tried halo-halo. I do enjoy icecream and the other items, but over crushed ice? I do not like what ends up as milky water. I know some enjoy and that is fine for them. With Durian, the taste is better than the smell, but I did not enjoy and it leaves a coating on the tongue like when you eat garlic.

  4. *lynne* says:

    … wait… something that stinks worse than durian??!! I’m going to have to look into that :D I love durian, btw :)

    One thing to point out wrt bananas: when visiting relatives in Switzerland back when I was young(er), there was only the one kind available in the stores… as opposed to in Malaysia, where you’ve got what seems like a gazillion varieties, some tiny, some huge, some bitter, some sweet, etc etc.

    re jackfruit: in Malaysia it’s viewed as a fruit that causes “wind”… not in terms of flatulence, but of major indigestion… I’ve had my stomach seem as if it’s twisting and turning inside me when I took jackfruit on an empty stomach. Take it as dessert after a meal and it should be okay.

    • Bruce says:

      Lynne,
      Look from a distance and best with a stuffed nose. :-)
      About bananas, that is true, in America I knew of the regular long yellow type and the plantains which are so good fried.
      Here there are many variaties. Big, small, fat, thin and green and yellow. The generic name for all types is Sagin.
      There is a joke here. A foreigner tells a Filipino, “I love all the types of Bananas but I like sagin the best.”
      and
      What do old ladies and bananas have in common? They are both sagin.

  5. taympers says:

    wow..so fresh! i like watermelon, havent tried to eat durian…even candies… i just dont like the smell.

    • Bruce says:

      Taympers,
      To me it is like all foods, some you like and some you don’t. Do not force others and maybe they do not force you.
      Shall we share a place of escargo?

  6. Teeth Health says:

    You will want fruit that is in season so that is will be in its most beautiful state. Teeth Health

  7. I want a mango from Guimaras. Never tasted something sweeter and nicer in my life. And I have tried all those fruits you mentioned and a few more:)

  8. Oh hi Bruce, fast response! I just got up here will have breakfast now, then run a half marathon! it is +6 now, so it is getting warmer finally..hehe. Well the Cebu Mangoes are probably great too. But Guimaras variety is really amazing. Sooooo sweet! I am sure Elena knows about Guimaras mangoes! Have a good day!

  9. Evelyn says:

    some that you missed out are the ff:guyabano,atis ,tieza,macopa,tambis (the pink one that is in your pix)and the santol

  10. Palawan says:

    Bruce, I like durian, marang and jack fruit. My grandfather grows almost any kind of fruit in minadanao. I sometimes with him to the market selling his fruits….Oh yeah …avocado as well..how are you anyway…!!!! It been pretty busy here…hahaha..can’t even write for my post…hehhee

  11. Evelyn says:

    which one,bruce?the tambis in your pix?the pink ones>
    if you are asking the pink ones..they have a tart taste..sharp taste-i think.. …..oh,i don’t know….i have forgotten the taste now..you have to sample so you can describe the taste..it’s been a long time that i haven’t tasted the tambis..
    i forgot to mention the rambutan fruits..they’re plentiful in Kidapawan..i think beside the tambis in your pix are rambutan..are those rambutan?yah, they’re rambutans..and i could see the chico/chicos, too in the pix…chicos look like the kiwi fruits in appearance..

  12. zelot66 says:

    Bruce,

    Durian is a king of fruit here in Malaysia and I believe everywhere in South East Asia countries. I don’t understand why Westerners don’t like it. Well, what is good for some, taboo for others. Btw, durian is also available in Hawaii Island.

    Rambutan is nice, one of my favourites. You can break it open with your hand. Jackfruit is called ‘Nangka’ here and there’s another jackfruit family called ‘Cempedak’. The shape is similiar, but much sweeter.

    Is there a fruit called ‘dragon fruit’ in philippines?

    • Bruce says:

      Zelot,
      I like the taste of rambutan, but a little hard to eat for me. I like mangostein too.
      I have heard of dragon fruit here but not sure if I have seen it. I will give it a try if I can find it.

  13. ceblogger says:

    Bruce, try these fruits as well (local names)

    tisa, atis, caimito, balimbing, kulo (breadfruit), lomboy, granada, kasoy, sineguelas

    • Bruce says:

      Ceblogger,
      Over time I hope to try more. breadfruit sounds interesting since I remember how they planted and tried to transport breadfruit to England.

  14. maria says:

    hi bruce
    i miss the guavas, santol, and kaimetos, YUM, YUM.

    maria

    • Bruce says:

      Maria,
      I know guava is avaliable in Florida and there was a grower in the Palm Beach area that grows Star Fruit, do not know the local name.

  15. laagan says:

    Where is my beloved Durian? I can not get enough of it

  16. Budzhot says:

    Hi Bruce,

    I really love Durian especially the candies. I miss Davao too It’s been a long years I haven’t visited my hometown. I am now residing here in Cavite, Philippines.

    Have you tried Durian coffee? :)

    • Bruce says:

      Budzhot,
      I have not tried the coffee or the candies. Tonight I was out and what I thought was Mango Float was Durian Float. As I was informed before I ate it, I passed it over to my wife.
      Many enjoy Durian, I do not.

  17. Nene says:

    hi, Bruce, love this post about Philippine fruits..of all the fruits you mentioned the only one i don’t care about is the marang..love durian and jackfruit, ‘tho..btw, don’t know if somebody already told you that the local name for star fruit is balimbing(Tagalog version) or balingbing (Visayan or Surigaonon version)…i’ve seen some star fruit when we were living in Seattle in one of the local supermarkets..
    nice post, thank you..

    • Bruce says:

      Nene,
      I tried Starfruit in Florida. To me you can taste citrus, but without a distinct flavor as a orange or grapefruit. I find the same with Pamelo.

  18. Healthy Diet Lets Woman Lose Thirty Pounds in Thirty Days says:

    Hi, nice post. I have been thinking about this issue,so thanks for writing. I’ll definitely be coming back to your posts.

  19. Rudy says:

    Hello Bruce,

    You missed the lanzones, especially from Camiguin. I guess they are not availiable now but You have to try them in autumn.

    There will be no problem with Your stomach unless You eat two pounds. On the other hand that can happen easily once You start eating.

    With the banana I’ve been disappointed. I thought maybe the small ones they sell in the Philippines would be more aromatic but the large ones availiable here in Europe, even if they get harvested while still green and ripened during transport are sweeter and tastier.

    • Bruce says:

      Rudy,
      Thanks for visiting this humble site.
      You are correct, I did miss the Lanzones, but you must agree, there are a lot of fruits native to the Philippines and I usually write from my head, not research unless I need to make sure I write correct information.

  20. Davao City is the Fruit Capital of the Philippines.
    They are abundant all year long because of the favorable climate the area has. Fruits sell cheap in the sidewalks, fruit stands, public markets and even in grocery stores. I challenge you to take a bite of each before you comment on them (good or bad). I lot of fruits grow in Davao which do not grow anywhere else in the country. Remember the Philippine Eagle and the Waling-waling?
    Davao has a lot of these Zoological and Botanical treasures too.
    Come to Davao even just for the fruits. Yuo will love it!!!

    • Bruce says:

      Hector,
      I have experienced some of the fruits that I have never tasted before. I enjoy rambutan, mangosteen, and lanzones. I have tasted Durian and smelled marang. I will not eat them. Pomelo to me has a strong citrus taste but little flavor whereas a grapefruit or orange does.

  21. Davao has the Mt. Apo, Pearl Farm, Japanese Tunnels, and the Paradise Island too, to name a few.

  22. Hello,
    i have dual residence: Iloilo City and Guimaras,which produces the sweetest mangoes…but mangoes are sweetest only when their days attached to the tree are completed (120 days), and where the trees were induced to bear fruit through the “tu=ub” (daily smoke from cut green grass/shrubs that is burned slowly every afternoon. If you taste sour mangoes in our island province, that’d mean that they gathered the fruits in less than 120 days, which period is the old growers’ standard. There are likewise very sweet mangoes from the municipality of Leon, Iloilo, where they still follow the old technique and standard. Buyt Guimaras mangoes are bigger and the seed is very much thinner. We still have a very old tree that could bear (if it wants,hahaha)fruits weighing 1 pound each. Trouble is, when the fruits start coming out, neighbors get so tempted we end up with almost no harvest! The tree is now engulfed with tall shrubbery, quite forgotten long after my grandparents died…the town of Guimbal also has much camunsil–i can’t describe it well…it’s almost it’s season, and because I am trying to p[ropagate fruit tress in our (hilly) place in Nazaret, I am going there to buy some camuncil to enjoy, and to have enough seeds for many trees…I am also into a breafruit movement project..me and my friends have founded an NGO concentrating on breadfruit and other marginalized fruit trees such as “Iba,” etc…I really enjoyed reading all of posts…thanks…

  23. Mario Jumamoy says:

    Hi Bruce,
    Davao’s most economicaly impt fruit is the banana,esp the Cavendish variety.Vast plantations were developed to produce for export.It provides empployment to the people and revenues to the govt.Healthwise,” Eat a banana a day and it keeps the doctor away”.

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